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The Toad Pod™ Chaser Conversion


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TeamToad

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#51
(10-27-2015, 06:27 PM) AA1PR Wrote: came along nicely, however it looks top heavy or is this deceiving ?



I don't have an exact calculation on the height of its CG, yet, but the upper part is mostly a shell.  Most of the weight is lower, and the two house batteries are between the trailing arms.

I didn't flip it on its maiden off road trip around the White Rim, which is promising.

--Fuzzy

TeamToad

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#52
Jut got back from taking the Toad Pod™ on its first off-road trip.  I went around the White Rim (clockwise, which puts the best views on the driver's side).  The Toad Pod held up well, and I really enjoyed having a heater when the outside temps got down to 19 degrees F.

Here's a view of the current interior:

[Image: toadpod-interior.jpg]

I need to add storage inside, but I didn't want to do that until I lived in it a few nights.  Also I was worried about the weight.

I stopped at AT Overland, the home of the original Chaser trailer, to get the suspension checked out, and they weighed it for me:

[Image: toadpod-weight-2.jpg]

With 20 gallons of gasoline and 10 gallons of water, plus a full load of food and cargo under the bed, the totals were:

[Image: toadpod-weight-1.jpg]

The total of 2,257 was within 7 pounds of my own estimates based on a simple weighing on a Cat Scale at a truck stop in Lubbock.  I question the placement of the scale for measuring the tongue weight, since the actual load is carried at the coupler.

At 16.7%, the tongue weight is too high (not 10-15 per their recommendations), so I moved some tools and water to the back to get it back to 14% tongue weight.  The top two fuels cans get used as soon as possible, so after reaching the trail or driving a little ways, the tongue weight gets lower anyway.

That's 13% over the tow rating of my Wrangler, so I worry about my transmission.  Not much to do about it, yet.

Here's the picture of the exterior at Camp Shafer in Canyonlands:

[Image: toadpod-camp.jpg]

And here's the beauty shot on the edge of the Colorado River near Potash Road:

[Image: toadpod-colorado.jpg]

In summary, a very successful maiden voyage.  The heater works almost too well, making it challenging to get back outside on a cold morning.  It's a good problem to have.

--Fuzzy

TeamToad

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#53
(10-24-2015, 04:06 PM) Rayjames Wrote: I had to hunt for some D rings like the ones you used. I used them when I bolted the tub to my frame.  It gives me a place to tie things down .  Lots of spots to be able to tie is a good thing .


These are from McMaster: Tie-down shackles

They are rated for 400 lbs each.

TeamToad

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#54
(11-23-2015, 07:36 AM) TeamToad Wrote: > That's 13% over the tow rating of my Wrangler, so I worry about my transmission.  Not much to do about it, yet.

Actually doing more research, I have the Tow Package on my Sahara Unlimited, which means my tow limit is 3,500 lbs (because I have 3.73 gears and the 6 cylinder engine with the 4 speed automatic).

My first step will be a transmission cooler.  Moab 4x4 Outpost recommended this unit:

DeRale Hyper-Cool 13760

And cautioned against installing it in front of the radiator, because that can cause the engine to overheat.

--Fuzzy

TomDegn

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#55
Totally dig your trailer. I've been to Canyonlands once and loved it. White Rim Trail is on my short list for maiden voyages.

TeamToad

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#56
(11-30-2015, 11:40 AM) TomDegn Wrote: Totally dig your trailer. I've been to Canyonlands once and loved it. White Rim Trail is on my short list for maiden voyages.


The key to doing the White Rim Trail is to reserve your spots exactly 4 months in advance (the backcountry reservation page is off the Canyonlands NP main web page.

It's a big circle, so you either go clockwise (starting at the Shafer Switchbacks or Potash Rd), or Counter clockwise (starting on Mineral Bottom Road).

It's about 100 miles of trail either way, so take extra fuel.

I think 3 days is the perfect amount of time to be there, going about 33 miles a day, but that's because I stop every 400 yards to take pictures :-)

--Fuzzy

Scott

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#57
Good to know on the the reservation system
Scott Chaney - Owner of Compact Camping Concepts
Home of the DIY Explorer Box and Dinoot trailers, also Tent Topped camping

 
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